Support for children aged 0-25 with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

SEND Support

SEND SupportSEND SupportUniversal Plus level: if quality first teaching approaches have not been enough to meet a child/young person’s needs and they need more focused, targeted support, they will be identified as having SEND. At Partnership Plus level more specialist advice is sought, put into place and reviewed. Quality first teaching, including evidenced, robust use of the ‘assess-plan-do-review’ cycle, rigorous teacher oversight, and close liaison between the setting and family will continue. SEN support includes help for children and young people with SEN that is additional or different from the universal support avaialble for other children and young people of the same age. The purpose of SEN support is to help children and young people achieve the outcomes and learning objectives that have been set for them. Education settings should involve parents and carers in the SEND support process. level stands for Special Educational Needs and DisabilitiesDisabilitiesA physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term negative effect on an individual’s ability to do normal daily activities. Support level.

SEND SupportSEND SupportUniversal Plus level: if quality first teaching approaches have not been enough to meet a child/young person’s needs and they need more focused, targeted support, they will be identified as having SEND. At Partnership Plus level more specialist advice is sought, put into place and reviewed. Quality first teaching, including evidenced, robust use of the ‘assess-plan-do-review’ cycle, rigorous teacher oversight, and close liaison between the setting and family will continue. SEN support includes help for children and young people with SEN that is additional or different from the universal support avaialble for other children and young people of the same age. The purpose of SEN support is to help children and young people achieve the outcomes and learning objectives that have been set for them. Education settings should involve parents and carers in the SEND support process. level is for children who need more help than is normally available to the rest of the class.

About 12 % of children and young people are at SEND SupportSEND SupportUniversal Plus level: if quality first teaching approaches have not been enough to meet a child/young person’s needs and they need more focused, targeted support, they will be identified as having SEND. At Partnership Plus level more specialist advice is sought, put into place and reviewed. Quality first teaching, including evidenced, robust use of the ‘assess-plan-do-review’ cycle, rigorous teacher oversight, and close liaison between the setting and family will continue. SEN support includes help for children and young people with SEN that is additional or different from the universal support avaialble for other children and young people of the same age. The purpose of SEN support is to help children and young people achieve the outcomes and learning objectives that have been set for them. Education settings should involve parents and carers in the SEND support process. level (that’s about 3 or 4 children in a class).

Early yearsEarly yearsPre-school education provision inlcuding day nurseries, pre-schools, school nurseries, childminders and play groups.  settings, schools and colleges are required to follow the SEND support approach set out in the SEND Code of Practice. The Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinator (SENCO) will play a key role in working with you and your child or young person to identify and plan what support is needed.

The early years provider, school or college will:

  • have identified that your child or young person has a Special Educational Need
  • recorded this in their records
  • advised you that your child or young person will receive SEND support
  • check that they're putting the right support in place for your child or young person
  • monitor the progress of your child or young person and keep records

Funding for SEND SupportSEND SupportUniversal Plus level: if quality first teaching approaches have not been enough to meet a child/young person’s needs and they need more focused, targeted support, they will be identified as having SEND. At Partnership Plus level more specialist advice is sought, put into place and reviewed. Quality first teaching, including evidenced, robust use of the ‘assess-plan-do-review’ cycle, rigorous teacher oversight, and close liaison between the setting and family will continue. SEN support includes help for children and young people with SEN that is additional or different from the universal support avaialble for other children and young people of the same age. The purpose of SEN support is to help children and young people achieve the outcomes and learning objectives that have been set for them. Education settings should involve parents and carers in the SEND support process.:

  • Early Years additional SEND Payments are grants to Early Years providers to help them to meet the special needs of children in their childcare setting. Payments are made using a two-tier system based on the child’s level of need.

School age and up to 25:

  • Funding is given directly to educational settings from the government to provide up to £6000 worth of support across a year for pupils with the greatest need at this level.
Forms of SEN support

Depending on their level of need some children may have a little extra support at SEND support level and others may have a lot. The support could include:

  • additional adult support for particular lessons or at key times. This may be from a teaching assistant (TA)
  • the use of a personalised work area
  • structured activities to develop specific social skills in small groups
  • assessment and advice from external support services and professionals
  • adaptions to the physical environment
  • support from a mentor or key worker
The Graduated Response

Education settings in Bournemouth, Christchurch and Poole use a Graduated Response to identify and support the needs of children with SEND. There are 3 versions of the Graduated Response:

Support for your child or young person will follow 4 stages of assess, plan, do and review.

Assess: Your child or young persons special educational needs will be assessed so that the right support and help can be provided. This will include:

  • finding out what you and your child or young person think they need most help with
  • talking to professionals who work with your child, such as their teacher
  • asking for advice from other specialist services if needed

Plan: In partnership with you and your child or young person, the setting will identify the outcomes that the SEN support needs to achieve and plan how to support your child or young person.

It should be clear how your child or young person will benefit from any support that is offered and you should also be involved with deciding on the expectations of any support.

Everyone involved should decide on a date when a review can take place so that it can be seen how well the support is working and whether the stated outcomes (what is expected will happen) are being achieved.

Do: The setting will put the planned suppport in place. Although the class teacher is responsible for working with school age children on a daily basis, the SENCO, and any support or specialist teaching staff involved in supporting your child or young person should work closely to track progress and make sure that the support is effective.

Review: There should be agreed times when reviews will take place. Settings should meet with the parents or carers of children with SEN support at least 3 times a year.

At the review you will decide, together with support professionals, whether the help being provided for your child or young person is having a positive impact, if the intended outcomes are being achieved or have been achieved and if any changes need to be made.

Reviews may also involve getting advice and further assessment from someone like an educational psychologist, a specialist teacher or a health professional.

If your child or young person isn't making good progress the school should involve a specialist. You will be involved in any decisions around this.

If your child is still finding it hard to learn after SEN support has been put in place, you or the setting can ask us to carry out an EHC needs assessment.

SEN Support for students aged 16-19

Young people over 16 will be fully involved in helping to design their own SEN support.

All students with SEND should be able to make a successful transition into adult life with the right support and preparation, including guidance on employment, independent living and playing an active part in the wider world.

Further Education Colleges should have access to specialist skills to support the learning of all students with SEND. There should be a named person who is able to review the SEN support and make sure it is well co-ordinated. Teaching and support staff should know who to contact if they need help with a student’s SEND and are concerned about their progress.

Functional literacy and numeracy courses should be available as part of the study programme for students without GCSEs (grade A to C) in English and Maths.

SEN support should develop the independence of students. Preparing students for employment with the help of outside agencies and via supported internships for those with EHC plans are ways colleges can encourage successful progression to a career. Colleges have a duty to secure independent, impartial careers advice for students aged 16 to 18 and develop ways to support students who wish to set up their own business in adult life.

Students should have choice and control over the type of support they receive to help them prepare for independent living. They should also have an understanding of what support will be available to them when they make the transition into adult life including financial support and knowledge of different types of accommodation.

Students with SEND should be encouraged to take part in college life and have a voice in college policy making. They should be helped to take part in student support networks and volunteering opportunities in the local community.

Visit the Preparing for Adulthood section of the Local Offer for a range of information to support young people moving into adulthood.

Further support

For independent advice you can speak to SENDiass.